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 Commitments   Chogyam Trungpa

Don't act With a Twist
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Tai Chi Imagery Book
Acting with a twist means that since you think you are going to get the best in any case, you might as well volunteer for the worst. That is very sneaky.
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For instance, in order to gain good results for yourself, you may temporarily take the blame for something. Or you may practice lojong very hard in order to get something out of it, or with the idea of protecting yourself from sickness. The practice of this slogan is to drop that attitude of looking for personal benefits from practice - either as an immediate or a long-term result.

From Training the Mind & Cultivating Loving-Kindness by Chogyam Trungpa , copyright 1993 by Diana Mukpo.
(Official Chogyam Trungpa Website)
Published by arrangement with Shambhala Publications, Inc., Boston.

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This site provides an on-line database of commentaries on the Tibetan Buddhist meditation practices of lojong (Mind Training) and tonglen.


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A contemporary reinterpretation of the proverbs, building on Jamgon Kongtrul's 19th century commentary, by the first man to teach Mind Training extensively in the West.
Fascinating autobiographical account of Trungpa's early life and training in Tibet, his daring escape to India, and his teaching in the West.
'The problem is that the ego can convert anything to its own use, even spirituality'. His incisive, compassionate teachings serve to wake us up from this trick that we all play on ourselves, and to offer us a far brighter reality: the true and joyous liberation that inevitably involves letting go of the self rather than working to improve it.
Incisive teachings by one of the most influential Tibetan Buddhist teachers in the West. A central theme: giving up our hopes that meditation will bring us bliss or tranquility or make us better or wiser people or otherwise serve our ego's purposes, and realizing the liberation that is right here within our pain and confusion and neurosis.